TREASURES OF HAWAII AND SOUTH PACIFIC - NOORDAM

South Pacific & New Zealand

Inclusions

TREASURES OF HAWAII AND SOUTH PACIFIC Fly, Cruise & Stay package includes:
- One Way economy airfare with a full service carrier from Sydney to Honolulu
- Transfer in Honolulu from Airport to Hotel
- 2 nights accommodation in a 4-star hotel in Honolulu +
- Transfer in Honolulu from Hotel to Port
- Pearl Harbor & Circle Island Tour: You want to do it all! , so lets go! As you start the day by standing on the Arizona Memorial, you'll add to that by experiencing the peacefulness of Punchbowl, the views from high upon the Pali, the joy of walking along famous beaches, the fun of eating from a shrimp truck, and how interesting it is to visit a pineapple plantation!
- 19 night Transpacific cruise onboard Noordam from Honolulu to Sydney ±
- Main Meals~ and entertainment onboard
- Airport taxes, Port charges and government fees

Details

21 Night Fly, Cruise & Stay Transpacific cruise onboard Noordam from Honolulu to Sydney including 4-star stay in Honolulu

19 Night Cruise sailing from Honolulu to Sydney aboard Noordam.

Named for the Northern compass point, Noordam features museum-quality art—from 19th oils to contemporary photographs of music greats Dizzy Gillespie and B.B. King. Guests onboard can enjoy cooking shows and hands-on workshops in partnership with America’s Test Kitchen. Explore the world’s wonders through BBC Earth Experiences. Take yoga or Pilates in our Fitness Center. Savor the sounds of Music Walk™ and the delights of our specialty restaurants.

Highlights of this cruise:

Honolulu, Hawaii, US
Sitting pretty on Oahu's south shore, the capital of Hawaii—and gateway to the island chain—is a suitably laid-back Polynesian mash-up of influences and experiences.

Modern surfing may have been invented along the crescent beach of Waikiki long before the glossy high-rise hotels arrived to dominate the shoreline, but the vibe is still mellow and it's still the go-to neighborhood. These days, the city adds dining, shopping and cocktails to its repertoire, all done with a view of the iconic Diamond Head in the distance.

But away from the Waikiki crowds, you get the scoop on the "real" Hawaii: brick Victorian buildings, including America's only royal palace; thriving Chinatown nightlife; sacred temple remains on distant bluffs; and the wartime memories of the attack on Pearl Harbor, including the USS Arizona Memorial.

Of course, the real Hawaii can't be quantified so easily. It's everywhere—in the volcanic nature of the soil, in its lush bounteous flora, and in the positive spirit of the people, who know there's real raw magic in their gentle islands.

Lahaina, Hawaii, US
Most of Polynesia has stories of the cultural hero and demigod Maui. In Hawaii, he's given credit for fishing up the islands from the ocean floor. He's also the one who caused the sun to move more slowly and who lifted the sky so people had room beneath. It's a long and complicated tale, snaking through dozens of variations.

But to the rest of the world, the word Maui just means the perfect island paradise, and Lahaina is the gateway to its most photogenic areas.

So how beautiful does a place have to be to win the title of paradise of paradises? Well, start with enormous stretches of beach, some full of surfers, some off bays packed with whales, some sporting nothing but your own footprints. Toss in two volcanic craters, one with a road that takes you from sea level to 3,055 meters (10,023 feet) and through tunnels of jacaranda trees. Then there's the rain forest, which you can experience on a scenic drive so full of twists and turns and waterfalls that 83 kilometers (52 miles) can take most of the day. At the end, though, you're rewarded with yet more falls, plus cool ponds perfect for a soak.

Yeah, Maui knew what he was doing when he pulled this island out of the sea.

Kona, Hawaii, US
Both culturally and geographically, Hawaii's Big Island divides into exact halves. The east is jungly, dark and prone to lava flows. The other side, the Kona side, grows all the coffee, and everyone wakes up really, really early. You might even see someone break the speed limit there, which is inconceivable elsewhere in the islands.

Much of this drier region almost resembles a desert. But the shapes of the hills and the way rain snags on ridges means Kona holds hundreds of microclimates. That's how the coffee growers have flourished: Variations of only a few feet in altitude can result in very different brews. Some farms cover barely an acre; others sprawl enough to encompass two or three varietals. Either way, the beans are babied—from bush to cup—by hand.

Thankfully, plenty of places exist to play and burn off a little caffeine around Kona. History lies thick on the ground, from Kamehameha's heiau (temple) to the sacred buildings of Puuhonua O Honaunau ("The Place of Refuge") to the bay where Captain Cook breathed his last. Whales love the Kona side, spinner dolphins live up to their names, and giant mantas slowly barrel roll up from the depths. Half an island is world enough.

Pago Pago
Pago Pago is the capital of American Samoa, a chain of seven South Pacific isles 2600 miles south of Hawaii. Pago Pago is a mixture of colorful semi-urban communities, a small town, and a harbor surrounded by dramatic cliffs, which plunge almost straight into the sea. A climb to the summit of Mt. Alava) provides a magnificent bird's-eye view of the harbor and town. Less spectacular is the view from the top of the pass above Aua Village on the road to Afono.

Pago Pago is actually one of the several villages along the shore of the harbor and is located at the very back (inside) of the embayment. However, because the name Pago Pago is associated with the harbor itself - the only significant port of call in American Samoa — Pago Pago is now generally applied to the whole harbor area, the town and including the village. The port itself is located in Fagatogo, a village adjacent to Pago Pago.

Savusavu
Savusavu is located 100 miles northeast of Suva on Vanua Levu, the second largest island in the Fiji Group. It is located on the shores of a large picturesque, deep water harbour where cruise ships visit regularly. The town has only one main street with a range of shops and services on offer.

Activities on Savusavu include scuba diving, sailing trips, sport fishing, cultural tours, snorkeling & kayaking. Attractions in the area include the thermal hot springs at Nakama and the blowholes at Namale. Tours and scenic drives, bay cruises and fishing, reef-beach activities and local entertainment are all easily arranged. A tour of a working copra plantation is a unique experience. The Planter’s Club located at the end of the main street is a center for social activity, as is the Copra Shed Marina.

Dravuni Island, Fiji
During the great age of exploration, when sailors were poking into every unknown corner of the globe, nobody went to the islands of Fiji, including Dravuni, some 65 kilometers (40 miles) to the south of the main island of Fiji. Ships would sail up far enough to see perfect beaches, blue-hole reefs and mountains big enough to be called mountains, but not so big you'd kill yourself hauling a cannon up one.

But then the Fijians would appear. Enormous people, faces tattooed in intricate designs, each carrying that one essential of Fijian life: a dark wooden club studded with shark teeth. The cannibal’s best friend.

Most of the stories of head-hunting and cannibalism were set in Fiji, where the greatest honors were given to those who brought home the most enemy heads. Since the residents of the archipelago’s 300 islands had been warring with each other for centuries, they saw in the arrival of representatives of the outside world an exciting (and potentially tasty) development.

But all things must pass, even cannibal rituals. Life on Fiji changed and these days, Fijians still come down to meet ships and they still carry war clubs, but instead of looking for lunch, they’re looking to yell "Bula!" in greeting to as many people as the day allows.

Lautoka, Fiji
Lautoka is not in a logical position to be one of Fiji’s busiest ports. Ports are usually found in bays or harbors; here it's just the open Bligh Water (yes, that Bligh, who, after his crew mutinied in Tahiti, proceeded to pull off one of the greatest sailing feats in history, which included not letting his remaining men get turned into the Fijian daily special).

Lautoka has a nice, fading colonial vibe with a 100-year-old sugar mill still in operation. The juxtaposition of Muslim mosques and Hindu temples in town, though, captures recent Fiji history in a nutshell. Indo-Fijians, many of whose ancestors had been brought over from India by the British in the 19th century as indentured laborers, eventually amassed enough power to begin buying up local stores and land. When the native Fijians noticed the imbalance, it led to a coup, a countercoup and, in 2006, a counter-countercoup. (Don’t fret: Visitors will not notice a thing. Democratic elections have resumed and all’s well.)

Only 15 kilometers (nine miles) from Lautoka’s hustle and bustle is the Koroyanitu National Heritage Park. In an almost magical exception to what usually goes on in the South Pacific, this park contains a fully protected, unlogged cloud forest. Hike to the mountaintop and enjoy endless blue-green views of all those Fijian islands the great European explorers missed from fear of headhunters and cannibals.

Isle of Pines
The Isle of Pines is part of New Caledonia and is situated 50km south east of the mainland and 80 km’s south-east of the capital Noumea. The island is characterized by tall narrow pine trees, perfect white sandy beaches and turquoise lagoons. This island was once a convict settlement for political prisoners from Paris and later became an ordinary prison.

The islands landscape consists of spectacular natural colours of white sand, green, blue water and lush green vegetation. The island is also beautiful under water as there are spectacular colourful corals and fish.

Vao on the islands southern most tip is the only real village. The islands sole church dominates the village centre.

Noumea, New Caledonia
Back in the days when European countries were establishing colonies all over the globe, the standard reason for territory-grabbing was riches: gold, silver, cumin. The French took a different approach. They grabbed what was pretty and proceeded to teach the locals how to bake outstanding baguettes. In fact, once they'd gained a foothold, they ignored the palm trees, the lagoons, the beautiful sharp mountains, and began creating mini-Frances wherever they could.

Nouméa is a French city with Polynesian accents, cooled by ocean breezes and set among tropical flowers the size of dinner plates. With one of the healthiest reef systems left on earth, the island’s lagoons, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, hold more than 9,000 species of fish and marine life. The Kanaks, the native people to whom the French first gave cooking lessons, already lived lives rich with fish, taro and coconuts fresh from the tree. And, although the two cultures didn’t always get along, they agreed on one thing: Stick with the prettiest real estate you can find.

Sydney
Sydney is located on the south-east coast of Australia. It is the largest and most populated city in Australia and the state capital of New South Wales. The city is built on hills surrounding Sydney Harbour where the Sydney Harbour bridge and the Sydney Opera House are located. The region features many bays, rivers, inlets and beaches including the famous Bondi Beach. Within the city are many picturesque parks including Hyde Park and the Royal Botanical Gardens.

The most well-known attractions include the Sydney Opera House and the Sydney Harbour Bridge. Other attractions include Royal Botanical Gardens, Luna Park, some 40 beaches and Sydney Tower. The Rocks precinct includes the first colonial village of Sydney and some great shops, cafes and galleries are located here. Sydney also has several popular museums, such as the Australian Museum (natural history and anthropology), the Powerhouse Museum (science, technology and design), the Art Gallery of New South Wales, the Museum of Contemporary Art and the Australian National Maritime Museum.

Please select your cabin type to enquire

Pricing (per person)

  • All (4)
Twin

Inside

AU $4,599

Outside

AU $4,699

Balcony

AU $6,129

Suite

AU $7,899

Terms & Conditions

*Conditions Apply: Prices are per person, capacity controlled and listed in Australian dollars twin share including port taxes. Prices may fluctuate if surcharges, fees, taxes or currency change, and may be withdrawn at any time. Prices shown here are not shown in real time. While we endeavour to keep our pricing as up-to-date as possible, the advertised prices shown here may differ from the live prices in our booking system. The prices shown are for a cash payment. Credit card fees of up to 2.5% will apply. Offer correct as at 12Feb19 and subject to live availability at time of booking. Prices are per person twin share based on best available cruise fare, inclusive of all discounts unless otherwise stated. All offers are capacity controlled and can be withdrawn or modified at any time without notice and subject to availability at time of booking. Outside and Balcony cabins may have obstructed views and Suite cabins comprises Junior Suites, Mini Suites and any other type of suite that represents the best value for each cruise. Unless otherwise stated, all packages containing airfare will require full airfare and taxes within 24 hours of reservation and cancellation/amendment conditions apply. Air taxes are included in package price and are subject to change depending on departure city. Unless otherwise stated, onboard gratuities are NOT included. ~Specialty restaurants may incur a surcharge. Cabins are based on guarantee and cabin number will not be assigned until documentation or embarkation. ±A night of the sailing is lost when crossing International Date Line. A non-refundable deposit applies to this sailing. +Most Honolulu hotels charge a mandatory resort fee between approx. 20-40USD per room per night paid directly to the hotel and cannot be collected in advance by our agency. An ESTA visa is required for travel to the USA & Canada and is the responsibility of the passenger to obtain this before travel. All passports, vaccinations and visas are the responsibility of the travelling guest to secure prior to departure from Australia. Some cruise lines reserve the right to impose a fuel levy if the NMEX price reaches a certain level - please check with your consultant at time of booking. Cruise deposit, amendment and cancellation conditions apply. Travel agent service fees not included. Special conditions apply - please ask for full details at time of enquiry. Offer ends 31Mar19 or until sold out/withdrawn from sale. Please note only residents with an Australian address are eligible to book Australian rates in Australian dollars. This cruise package is provided by Seven Oceans Cruising, please ask your travel agent to contact us for more information.

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World Wide Cruise Centre
World Wide Cruise Centre