MS KONINGSDAM 13 NIGHT MEDITERRANEAN LEGENDS

EU Mediterranean

Inclusions

**Exclusive Inventory**

Cruise Package includes:
- 13 Night Mediterranean Legends cruise onboard ms Koningsdam from Rome return
- BONUS! US$50per twin cabin ONBOARD CREDIT^
- BONUS! Pinnacle Grill Lunch for Two (Specialty dining experience)^
- Main Meals~ and entertainment onboard
- Port charges and government fees

Details

BONUS OFFER^ 13 Night Mediterranean Legends cruise onboard ms Koningsdam from Rome return

13 Night Cruise sailing roundtrip from Rome onboard Koningsdam.

The first of Holland America Line’s Pinnacle-class ships, Koningsdam combines 21st- century elegance and nautical tradition. Inspired by music, her design features fluid lines, light-filled spaces and innovative, new dining and entertainment venues—from the dazzling, two-story World Stage to Music Walk™, with Lincoln Center Stage, B.B. King’s Blues Club and Billboard Onboard. Truly a destination all her own, there’s much to explore on Koningsdam.

Highlights of this cruise:

Civitavecchia (Rome), Italy
Rome is both a modern bustling city and an ancient open-air museum. You can walk in the footsteps of emperors, have coffee in Renaissance piazzas and see contemporary art all in one afternoon. Your sightseeing time in Rome begins at the nearby port of Civitavecchia, a seaside town with roots that stretch back to the Etruscan era. Take note of the Forte Michelangelo (both Bramante and Michelangelo had a hand in its design), and the lungomare, a lively stretch along the sea with beach clubs, bars and restaurants.

Once in the Eternal City you can fill your day with museums, churches, archaeological sites, traditional trattorias, artisan shops and, of course, gelato. The Colosseum and the Vatican Museums are Rome's superstar attractions, but there are plenty of quieter gems to explore. For food lovers there are the markets in Campo de' Fiori or the slightly farther flung Testaccio. The hip neighborhood of Monti, next to the Colosseum, has a vibrant piazza scene and boutique shopping, while the Villa Borghese offers a green oasis with a view towards Saint Peter’s Basilica and the masterpiece-filled Galleria Borghese. Although Rome might not have been built in one day, you'll certainly be able to see the highlights and top things to do in Rome in 24 hours.

Dubrovnik, Croatia
On the southern end of Croatia's Adriatic coast, Dubrovnik staked its claim to glory during the 450 years it existed as the independent Ragusan Republic, shoulder to shoulder with mighty forces like Venice and the Ottoman Empire. Once a renowned seafaring, shipbuilding and trading center, today it's an enchanting tourist destination. Dubrovnik seduces sightseeing visitors with its polished (and very clean!) limestone streets, theatrical architecture, charming
café, welcoming restaurants and distinctive shops along scenic side streets. The natural backdrop, much of which is protected, consists of pine and cypress forests and the shimmering Adriatic, dotted with uninhabited islands. Visitors quickly discover that the wider Dubrovnik area is just as striking as its main attraction—the Old Town.

A wander around the historic heart of Dubrovnik can hit the main sights, but take it a step further (or a staircase further, really), and you'll see that people do still live in the historic quarter, even though its polished streets make it look like a museum. You may catch the sound of a piano from the High School of Music and Arts, or hear the Dubrovnik Symphony Orchestra rehearsing in the Revelin Fortress, or encounter school kids on a break. Life unrolls as you stroll past.

Kotor, Montenegro
Cruising into the Bay of Kotor, you'll be wowed by the dramatic beauty of this coastal Montenegrin town. Dreamy seafront villages are set to a backdrop of mountains plummeting into the Adriatic Sea, while the stone labyrinth of the Old Town is filled with medieval architecture and historic monuments—as well as the narrowest street in the world..

The area only became part of Montenegro after WWII, and as such has a very different history to the rest of the country. Kotor escaped Ottoman rule and developed as an important Venetian trading post, before being conquered by the Austro-Hungarian Empire, France and Russia. The city pays tribute to this dynamic history with Venetian gates, Napoleon's theater and Austrian prisons all waiting to be discovered. There's a reason it was named a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

The cruise ship dock is across the street from the Sea Gate, the main entrance to the Old Town, while a conveniently located taxi stand by the harbor gates allows for easy exploration of the region.

Split, Croatia
Croatia’s second-biggest city oozes small-town charm, thanks to its quaint, narrow streets and the easygoing lifestyle that the Dalmatians are known for.

With a busy ferry port, Split is the point of access to the many islands up and down the coast. Much of its old town is within the walls of Diocletian's Palace, a 1,700-year-old UNESCO-listed fortress on the Adriatic seafront. Roman Emperor Diocletian built the palace as his retirement home on the sea and through the centuries many conquerors have taken refuge within its thick walls.

Today, Split is a lively city and home to some 200,000 residents, and getting lost in its labyrinthine streets is the best way to explore its historic heart. Stumble across lively cafés and shops tucked into its ancient palace, or venture beyond it to discover busy squares and markets, quiet trails and beautiful beaches.

Koper, Slovenia
If you are familiar with Slovenia, you likely think of it as an alpine country, with soaring summits and forested foothills. The country does, however, have one small sliver of access to the sea—47 kilometers (29 miles) of Adriatic coastline, squeezed between Italy and Croatia. The only significant city there is the country’s major port, Koper. The Republic of Venice ruled the city for more than five centuries, from 1279 to 1797. La Serenissima’s influence is reflected in Koper’s architecture, in buildings like the 15th-century Venetian-Gothic Praetorian Palace and other works like the 17th-century Da Ponte Fountain, which recalls the bridges spanning Venice's canals. Wandering the narrow cobbled streets and squares of the Old Town—where you’ll hear residents speak both Italian and Slovene—you’ll pass a number of even earlier, medieval sites, including the 12th-century Carmine Rotunda and the Cathedral of the Assumption, with a tower that houses one of the oldest bells in Slovenia. Also worth stops are the Venetian-Gothic Almerigogna Palace, painted with floral motifs, and Taverna, a bar and event space located in a historic former salt warehouse.

Kerkira, Nisos Kerkira (Corfu), Greece
Corfu is the pearl of the Ionian Sea, attracting royalty from across Europe in the 19th century, and modern celebrities from all over the world ever since. The island reflects a triple heritage. As well as being undeniably Greek, the culture and food also show a clear nod towards nearby Italy, particularly Venice, whose fortresses dot the island. The British influence may be unexpected, but as they ruled the island for many years, they have left such surprises in the Mediterranean as cricket and ginger beer.The bustling atmosphere of Corfu Town remains elegant, infused with culture and history. Parts of the rest of the island have been overdeveloped, but there are still great swaths that epitomize why the Greek islands are still regarded as the most beautiful in the world, with white-sand beaches backed by verdant mountains hiding traditional old villages. It is easy to see how Corfu has inspired generations of writers: from Shakespeare, through Edward Lear, to Gerald Durrell. A true gem.

Catania, Sicily, Italy
Sicily’s second-largest city is intimately connected to the active volcano that towers above it. The smoking, gurgling peak of Mt. Etna, one of the island's most iconic landmarks, has shaped Catania significantly, most notably in the 1600s when an eruption sent lava flowing to the sea. But the real damage happened some 25 years later when an earthquake rocked and destroyed the city. Catania was reconstructed in the Baroque style using the lava rock at hand, earning the historical center its UNESCO World Heritage status. In the 20th century, Catania had a reputation as a rough-and-tumble port, but recent decades have seen major restoration and revitalization, making the city an ideal spot to explore local street markets, visit Roman ruins and learn about a rich history that dates back to Ancient Greece. Catania’s central location on the eastern Sicilian coast also makes it a great base for exploring nearby Taormina and Syracuse, the wineries on Mt. Etna and idyllic local beaches.

Valletta, Malta
The ancient city of Valletta is teeming with historic monuments, churches and gardens. At just one-third of a square mile in area, Europe's southernmost capital is one of the easiest to explore on foot. Given Malta's strategic location and succession of rulers including the Romans, Normans, Sicilians, Spanish, Knights of St. John, French and British, it’s somewhat surprising to see Valletta so well preserved. The city dates back to the 16th century and has been listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1980. Extensive restorations of historic buildings are underway, including the rebuilding of the city entrance to mark Valletta's recognition as the European Capital of Culture in 2018. Decades of British rule mean that English remains an official language, along with the local Maltese language, plus a curious mix of Italian vocabulary and Semitic roots. As Malta lies just 50 miles south of Sicily, Italian influences dominate the cuisine and culture. Even so, the Maltese do value their own traditions, such as the folk music known as Għana, which features strong yet poetic male vocals over slow guitar music.

Please select your cabin type to enquire

Pricing (per person)

  • All (4)
Twin

J - Interior Stateroom

AU $2,899

E - Oceanview Stateroom

AU $3,399

VD - Verandah Stateroom

AU $4,099

B - Vista Suite

AU $4,599

Terms & Conditions

*Conditions Apply: Prices are per person, capacity controlled and listed in Australian dollars twin share including port taxes. Prices may fluctuate if surcharges, fees, taxes or currency change, and may be withdrawn at any time. Prices shown here are not shown in real time. While we endeavour to keep our pricing as up-to-date as possible, the advertised prices shown here may differ from the live prices in our booking system. The prices shown are for a cash payment. Credit card fees of up to 2.5% will apply. Prices are per person twin share based on best available cruise fare, inclusive of all discounts unless otherwise stated. All offers are capacity controlled and can be withdrawn or modified at any time without notice and subject to availability at time of booking. Outside and Balcony cabins may have obstructed views and Suite cabins comprises Junior Suites, Mini Suites and any other type of suite that represents the best value for each cruise. ^Onboard credit is non-refundable, non-transferable and cannot be redeemed for cash or used in the Medical centre or Casino. Pinnacle Grill bonus lunch and Caneletto dinner are non-refundable and are to be arranged once onboard and is subject to availability. ~Specialty restaurants may incur a surcharge. All passports, vaccinations and visas are the responsibility of the travelling guest to secure prior to departure from Australia. Some cruise lines reserve the right to impose a fuel levy if the NMEX price reaches a certain level - please check with your consultant at time of booking. Cruise deposit, amendment and cancellation conditions apply. Travel agent service fees not included. Special conditions apply - please ask for full details at time of enquiry. Please note only residents with an Australian address are eligible to book Australian rates in Australian dollars. This cruise package is provided by Seven Oceans Cruising, please ask your travel agent to contact us for more information.

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World Wide Cruise Centre
World Wide Cruise Centre