Maasdam, Great Alaskan Explorer ex Vancouver Roundtrip

Alaska & Canada West

Details

14 Night Cruise sailing from Vancouver roundtrip aboard Maasdam.

14 Night Cruise sailing from Vancouver roundtrip aboard Maasdam.

The only ship in the Holland America Line fleet dedicated to EXC In-Depth™ Voyages, Maasdam showcases the world at its most engaging, authentic and personal. Each voyage features fascinating lectures, interactive workshops, cultural performances and memorable shore excursions to explore your destination through the lens of photography, culture, nature and port-to-table culinary experiences. Maasdam’s size also gives her access to many new and off-the-beaten-path ports of call, allowing you to delve deeper into the places and cultures you visit. And being the only Holland America Line ship outfitted with nimble, inflatable Zodiacs, on select port calls you can go further in depth to explore nature, history, culture and more with these agile boats.

Highlights of this cruise:

Vancouver, B.C, Canada
Once a trading post and a rough-and-tumble sawmilling settlement, today modern Vancouver, Canada is many things. It’s a bustling seaport, a hub for outdoor enthusiasts looking for active things to do in Vancouver, an ethnically diverse metropolis and Hollywood of the North. Hemmed in by mountains and sea, Vancouver seduces visitors with its combination of urban sophistication and laid-back attitude against a backdrop of glass towers and modern sights and plentiful green spaces.
Vancouver's culinary and cocktail scene is on the rise—and its excellent restaurants and hopping bars have a distinctively local stamp on them. If you are looking for where to go in Vancouver for music, theater and the arts, they are thriving in the city’s many museums, galleries and performance venues. Beyond the downtown attractions in Vancouver, days of exploration and sightseeing await among the colorful suburbs, unspoiled islands and the vast, rugged wilderness.

Ketchikan, Alaska, US
Alaska’s “First City” of Ketchikan is so named because it’s the first major landfall for most cruisers as they enter the picturesque fjords of the Inside Passage, where the town clings to the banks of the Tongass Narrows, flanked by green forests nurtured by abundant rain. Ketchikan has long been an important hub of the salmon-fishing and -packing industries—visitors can try their luck on a sportfishing excursion or simply savor the fresh seafood at one of the local restaurants. It is also one of the best spots along the Inside Passage to explore the rich cultural sights of Native Alaskan nations like the Tlingit, Haida and Tsimshian. You can see intricately carved totem poles at the Totem Heritage Center and Totem Bight State Park, while the attractions of Saxman Village just outside of Ketchikan offers the chance to see Tlingit culture in action, with working carvers and a dance show in the clan house. And leave time to explore the sights in the town itself, including historic Creek Street, a boardwalk built over the Ketchikan Creek, where you can shop for souvenirs, smoked salmon and local art, while exploring gold rush­–era tourist attractions like Dolly’s House Museum.

Haines (Skagway), Alaska, US
There’s a reason Haines is known as the adventure capital of Alaska. Although many cities in Alaska feel different than those in “the lower 48,” Haines is more unusual than most with its unique rustic feel. It’s almost as if time has stopped and chain stores, and even stoplights, haven’t infiltrated this town of 1,300 that once topped Outside magazine’s list of “20 Best Places to Live and Play.” In the late 1890s, when Jack Dalton turned an Indian trail into a tollway ($10 for four horses with an unloaded sled or wagon), the town emerged as a stop for prospectors headed to the Yukon for the Klondike Gold Rush. Decades later it became a logging town, before turning to tourism beginning in the 1970s. These days, Haines is known as a haven for artists and nature lovers and is visited by far fewer cruise ships than other Alaskan coastal cities. Haines is a hotspot for rafting and hiking, salmon-, halibut- and trout-fishing in the Chilkat River or kayaking on Chilkoot Lake—as well as heli-skiing in the winter. During the late fall and early winter, thousands of bald eagles migrate through this area to feed on the salmon, an event celebrated by the Alaska Bald Eagle Festival in November. The memory of prospector days lingers on with opportunities to pan for gold, while the Indian Arts gallery, with its totem pole carving studio, offers a glimpse of an even older Haines.

Icy Strait Point, Alaska, US
Back in the old days when a freezer was a piece of ice, fishermen in Alaska had two problems. The first one was finding the fish, although that wasn’t too complicated, the ocean was chock-full of fins; but the second problem was a little harder. The government regulated how long you could keep your catch on the boat, and it wasn’t very long. Canneries were the answer. Owning a cannery was having a license to print money. Really. As operations spread up and down Southeast Alaska, each cannery had its own currency. True company towns, canneries had their own workforce, their own laws. A big cannery needed a couple hundred workers, for everything from keeping books to making the millions of cans needed to ship all that fish, as well as the actual cleaning and prepping of fish on the line, called "slime row." Canneries were usually somewhere beautiful, someplace you could see from far off and aim your boat towards. But canneries didn’t survive the advent of refrigeration. Most were taken back by the forest or simply left to rot. With one exception: Icy Strait Point, beautifully restored. Just opposite Glacier Bay, Icy Strait Point stretches for a few hundred meters along the beach; the old wooden buildings, bright red in the endless green of the Tongass, now offer a museum and a cannery demo. But more interesting is simply the madness of scale. Icy Strait Point gives a chance to look into history to see where Alaska’s money came from, all in a ghost town of millions of fish.

Anchorage, Alaska, US
After long and dark winters, Alaskans love their summers and the residents of Anchorage, Alaska are no exception. The city plants thousands of flowers to celebrate the arrival of warmer months and days that last as long as 19 hours from dawn to dusk. Approximately 40 percent of Alaska’s population lives in Anchorage. This diverse city of 300,000 includes a large military population, Native Alaskans, individuals who work for the oil industry and adventure-seeking types who want to get away from “the Lower 48.” Much like Seattle, Anchorage is a place where you can find a coffee shop (or espresso shack) anywhere. Locals enjoy skijoring, a winter sport where a person is pulled on skis by one or more dogs or sometimes a horse. While some cities have deer, Anchorage has lots of moose, known for being a bit rambunctious (and should be steered clear of if seen wandering down a street). Anchorage is a city where you can see the northern lights—the aurora borealis—on a clear dark night, typically during colder months. There are also plenty of active things to do and attractions to hike, bike and see wildlife such as the Tony Knowles Coastal Trail or Flattop Mountain Trail inside Chugach State Park.

Homer, Alaska, US
This plucky little town sells End of the Road certificates to visitors who’ve motored here to the furthest reach of the Kenai Peninsula. It’s something worth celebrating: a drive down the world’s longest street that protrudes into the ocean! But walkers, bikers and in-line skaters can also experience the thrill, thanks to a 6.5-kilometer-long (four-mile-long) paved multiuse trail. The rich fishing grounds here attracted Native Alaskans centuries before Captain James Cook claimed the Kenai Peninsula for Britain in 1778. After some Russian tyranny—fur traders forced Native Alaskans to hunt sea-otter pelts for them—Homer got a proper start as an English-settled coal-mining town in the 1890s. Today the area’s known as the Halibut Fishing Capital of the World, and it captivates audiences around the globe as the home of the Discovery Channel’s Kilcher family, made famous by Alaska: The Last Frontier. Homer’s port also anchors the F/V Time Bandit, which swashbuckled into TV viewers’ hearts via Deadliest Catch. Top Homer attractions include the Pratt Museum, the Alaska Islands and Ocean Visitor Center and hikes at Grewingk Glacier Lake.

Juneau, Alaska, US
Juneau, Alaska may well be the most remote, most beautiful and strangest state capital in the United States. Surrounded by water, forest and mountain sights, visitors seeking things to do in Juneau indoors and outdoors can hike a glacier, eat fresh-caught fish on a seaside patio and tour a grand capitol building all in one day. The city itself is pleasant, but the real highlight of a visit to Juneau is tracking down some wildlife. You can hike up Mount Roberts to chance upon wild deer and bald eagles. Most sightseeing and whale-watching tours head north to Auke Bay—bring a good pair of binoculars to get the best view of these majestic and surprisingly graceful creatures. If you prefer land mammals, catch a floatplane to a nearby wildlife reserve such as Chichagof or Admiralty Island to spy some bears lolling around. The sleepy, misty city of around 32,000—mostly fishermen and small-business owners—has a frontier town vibe, but welcomes more than a million visitors each summer to its natural attractions, cementing Juneau as Alaska’s number-one tourist destination.

Scenic Cruising The Inside Passage
Alaska’s Inside Passage is a protected network of waterways that wind through glacier-cut fjords and lush temperate rain forests along the rugged coast of Southeast Alaska. Arguably one of the greatest cruising routes in the world, the Inside Passage stretches through stunning landscapes, from Misty Fjords National Monument to famed Glacier Bay National Park & Preserve. Sailing the Inside Passage offers opportunities to spot some of Alaska’s most iconic wildlife, with humpback whales and orca plying the bountiful waters alongside the ships, bald eagles soaring overhead and brown bears lumbering on the shoreline. Numerous ports along the way recount Alaska’s colorful history. In Sitka, an onion-domed church marks Russia’s onetime foothold in the Americas; Ketchikan provides a glimpse of the Native Alaskan experience, with historic totem poles and native-arts galleries; and the legendary town center of Skagway bustles as it did at the turn of the 19th century, when it served as the rowdy Wild West gateway to the Klondike Gold Rush.

Pricing (per person)

  • All (30)
Quad Triple Twin Single

MM - Interior Stateroom

Request Request AU$ 2,999 Request

N - Interior Stateroom

Request Request AU$ 2,999 Request

M - Interior Stateroom

Request Request AU$ 3,039 Request

L - Interior Stateroom

Request Request AU$ 3,079 Request

K - Interior Stateroom

Request Request AU$ 3,119 Request

J - Interior Stateroom

Request Request AU$ 3,159 Request

I - Interior Stateroom

Request Request AU$ 3,199 Request

IQ - Interior Spa Stateroom

Request Request AU$ 3,239 Request

H - Large Oceanview Stateroom (Obstructed view)

Request Request AU$ 3,299 Request

HH - Large Oceanview Stateroom (Obstructed View)

Request Request AU$ 3,299 Request

G - Large Oceanview (Porthole) Stateroom

Request Request AU$ 3,369 Request

FF - Large Oceanview Stateroom

Request Request AU$ 3,599 Request

F - Large Oceanview Stateroom

Request Request AU$ 3,669 Request

EE - Large Oceanview Stateroom

Request Request AU$ 3,739 Request

E - Large Oceanview Stateroom

Request Request AU$ 3,809 Request

DD - Large Oceanview Stateroom

Request Request AU$ 3,879 Request

DA - DA- Large Oceanview Stateroom

Request Request AU$ 3,949 Request

D - Large Oceanview Stateroom

Request Request AU$ 4,019 Request

C - Large Oceanview Stateroom

Request Request AU$ 4,089 Request

CQ - Large Oceanview Spa Stateroom

Request Request AU$ 4,159 Request

CA - Lanai Stateroom

Request Request AU$ 4,899 Request

BB - Vista Suite

Request Request AU$ 5,799 Request

BC - Vista Suite

Request Request AU$ 5,799 Request

BA - Vista Suite

Request Request AU$ 6,079 Request

B - Vista Suite

Request Request AU$ 6,359 Request

BQ - Vista Spa Suite

Request Request AU$ 6,639 Request

A - Vista Suite

Request Request AU$ 6,919 Request

SB - Neptune Suite

Request Request AU$ 10,999 Request

SA - Neptune Suite

Request Request AU$ 11,699 Request

PS - Pinnacle Suite

Request Request AU$ 21,499 Request

Please note, while prices and inclusions are accurate at time of loading they are subject to change due to changes in cruise line policies and pricing and due to currency fluctuations. Currency surcharges may apply. Please check details of price and inclusions at time of booking.

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World Wide Cruise Centre
World Wide Cruise Centre