Island, South Pacific & Indian Ocean ex Los Angeles to Dubai

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56 Night cruise sailing from Los Angeles to Dubai onboard Island Princess.

56 Night cruise sailing from Los Angeles to Dubai onboard Island Princess.

Island Princess is your own private retreat on the sea. Whether you crave relaxation or exhilaration, you'll find the soothing Lotus Spa®, live entertainment, gourmet cuisine, casino gaming and more. And for a special treat, try the Bayou Café and Steakhouse, which features New Orleans-inspired Cajun and Creole cuisine.

Highlights of this cruise:

Los Angeles, California
The City of Angels always hovers between dream and reality. Once a near-forgotten colonial outpost, the pueblo metamorphosed into an agrarian paradise before reinventing itself as a movie colony. Perhaps no other city owes so much to the technological innovations of the 20th century, from the automobile to the airplane. Little wonder that LA is oft described as the "dream machine." In LA, reinvention is a way of life. Yet this talent for change has created a city with a rich ethnic diversity and a sizzling culture. LA is the source for trends that migrate across the country and then the world. Where else can you enjoy a Thai taco or munch on a kosher burrito? Or travel from downtown's high rises to the beaches of Malibu, shopping in Beverly Hills along the way?

Honolulu
Honolulu is the capital city of Oahu and is the cultural, industrial, commercial, and governmental center of Hawaii, with Waikiki Beach the epicenter of the tourist industry. It is a thriving world-class city, with nearly one million people in its metropolitan area Oahu is the most popular of the Hawaiian Islands and it’s easy to understand why – there’s so much to do on Oahu!

With Waikiki as a central hub, you can explore the legendary North Shore of Oahu one day, and spend the next day on the east side snorkeling at Hanauma Bay, a protected marine sanctuary with tons of colorful fish. Oahu offers just the right amount of diversity for the adventurous as well as the cautious visitor. Thrill seekers can skydive at Mokuleia while daydreamers can relax peacefully on the beach. Exquisite dining and exciting nightlife also entice people to Oahu again and again.

Kona, Hawaii
Welcome to the Big Island of Hawaii and to Kona. The Kona Coast is a land of infinite variety, ranging from pristine beaches to rolling uplands that are home to coffee plantations, macadamia groves and the largest privately owned cattle ranch in the United States. To the southeast lies Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, home to Mauna Loa, Mauna Kea, and Kilauea, one of the most active volcanoes in the world. And offshore lies a fisherman's paradise. Kona is hailed as "The Billfish Capital of the World," and the town hosts the annual Hawaiian International Billfish Tournament.

Twice as large as the other major Hawaiian Islands combined, Hawaii's terrain ranges from tropical beaches to the alpine crags and basalt heights of Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. At over 10,000 feet above sea level, Mauna Kea is the highest point in the Pacific Basin. On Hawaii, the temperature is always a result of elevation.

Note: Kona is an anchorage port. Transportation from ship to shore is via the ship's tender service.

Tahiti (Papeete), French Polynesia
Tahiti is not just an island - Tahiti has always been a state of mind. The bustling capital of Tahiti and her islands, Papeete is the chief port and trading center, as well as a provocative temptress luring people to her shores. Immortalized in the novel "Mutiny on the Bounty," who could blame the men of "HMS Bounty" for abandoning their ship in favor of basking in paradise? And what would Modern Art be without Tahiti's influence on Gauguin and Matisse? Today the island is a charming blend of Polynesian "joie de vivre" and Gallic sophistication. But venture out from Papeete and you find a landscape of rugged mountains, lush rainforests, cascading waterfalls and deserted beaches.

Contrasting with other French Polynesian ports, Papeete's coastline initially greets you with a vista of commercial activity that graciously gives way to both black and white-sand beaches, villages, resorts and historic landmarks.

Bora Bora, French Polynesia
Majestic mountains sculpted by ancient volcanoes, a shimmering lagoon and a barrier reef dotted with tiny motu, or islets - welcome to Bora Bora, perhaps the most stunning island in the South Pacific. Only 4,600 people live a seemingly idyllic lifestyle in the main villages of Vaitape, Anau and Faanui. No wonder those generations of travelers - including novelist James Michener - regarded Bora Bora as an earthly paradise.

Connected to its sister islands by water and by air - the landing strip sits atop Motu Mute, one of the reef's islets - Bora Bora remains relatively unspoiled by the modern world.

Note: Bora Bora is an anchorage port. Transportation from the ship to shore will be via the ship's tender service.

Pago Pago, American Samoa
Pago Pago Bay is one of the most dramatic harbors in the South Pacific, a region known for dramatic landscapes. Eons ago, the massive seaward wall of a volcano collapsed and the sea poured in. Today, dramatic mountain peaks encircle the deep harbor.

The capital of American Samoa, Pago Pago is more village than city. The town is dominated by looming Mt. Pioa, whose summit draws moisture-bearing clouds, earning it the nickname of "The Rainmaker." Indeed, Pago Pago draws more than its fair share of rain - the island of Tutuila is a vision of deep, verdant green.

Pronounced "Pango Pango," this island paradise awaits exploration.

Suva, Fiji
The Fiji archipelago is at the cross roads of the South Pacific. In the days of sailing ships, it was known as "The Cannibal Isles," where mariners carefully avoided its fierce warriors and perfidious waters. Thankfully, Fiji's pagan days live only in the tales recalled by tour guides - in rituals such as firewalking, Kava Ceremonies and in renditions of tribal drumming, dance and song.

Fiji is an exotic destination, with 333 islands that provide an exciting adventure or peaceful repose. The northwest region, where the sun shines almost every day and a tropical shower ends as quickly as it began, is home to the majority of the resorts. Suva, the political, administrative, educational and commercial center, has a backdrop of lush rainforest maintained by the inevitable "tropical downpour." The people of Fiji are the most multiracial and multicultural of all South Pacific island countries - this being reflected in churches of all denominations, mosques, temples and shrines.

Built around a reef-protected natural harbor, Suva, with its colonial buildings nestled alongside modern commercial venues, shops and local markets, parks and residential sprawl, is home to nearly half of Fiji's urban population.

Bay of Islands, New Zealand
The Bay of Islands offers more than broad vistas of sea and sky, more than beaches, boating, and fabulous water sports. The Bay is the birthplace of modern New Zealand. Here the Treaty of Waitangi was signed, establishing British rule and granting the native inhabitants equal status. Rich in legend and mystery, the Bay of Islands has age-old ties to the Maori and to whalers, missionaries and New Zealand's early settlers.

The Bay of Islands has lured explorers for countless centuries. The Maori say that Kupe, the great Polynesian adventurer, came here in the 10th century. Captain Cook anchored offshore in 1769, followed by assorted brigands, traders, colonists and missionaries.

Note: Bay of Islands is an anchorage port. Passengers transfer to shore via ship's tender.

Auckland, New Zealand
Straddling a narrow isthmus created by 60 different volcanoes, New Zealand's former capital boasts scenic beauty, historical interest and a cosmopolitan collection of shops, restaurants, museums, galleries and gardens. Rangitoto, Auckland's largest and youngest volcano, sits in majestic splendor just offshore. Mt. Eden and One Tree Hill, once home to Maori earthworks, overlook the city. One of New Zealand's fine wine districts lies to the north of Auckland.

Auckland served as New Zealand's capital from 1841 until 1865, when the seat of government moved to Wellington.

Tauranga, New Zealand
New Zealand's natural bounty is always on display at the Bay of Plenty. It was Captain James Cook who in 1769 aptly named this bay, thanks to the prosperous Maori villages of the region. Tauranga, the chief city, is a bustling port, an agricultural and timber center and a popular seaside resort. Tauranga is also the gateway to Rotorua - a geothermal wonderland that is the heart of Maori culture. A 90-minute drive from Tauranga, Rotorua is New Zealand's primary tourist attraction.

Your ship docks near the foot of Mt. Maunganui, which rises 761 feet above the bay. Across the harbor, Tauranga offers scenic tidal beaches at Omokoroa and Pahoia. The region boasts fine beaches, big-game fishing, thermal springs and seaside resorts.

Picton, New Zealand
Located at the head of Queen Charlotte Sound, Picton is your gateway to the South Island's famed Marlborough District. Once known primarily for its lush farm lands and many sheep stations, Marlborough came to international attention thanks to a new agricultural product - wine. The release of the 1985 Cloudy Bay Sauvignon Blanc put New Zealand on the map and changed the world's focus on winemaking in the Southern Hemisphere. Today, the Marlborough region boasts dramatic sea and landscapes, fascinating wine country, excellent restaurants and a number of the nation's finest gardens.

Military names abound in this corner of New Zealand - the region is named for the first Duke of Marlborough, while the largest town, Blenheim, is named after his most famous battle. Picton is named for Sir Thomas Picton, a favorite of another general, the first duke of Wellington.

Wellington, New Zealand
New Zealand's capital offers stunning views of forested peninsulas, dramatic cliff-side homes and fine Victorian buildings. Settled in 1840 by the London-based New Zealand Company, "wonderful, windy Wellington" is frequently buffeted by bracing winds funnelling through Cook Strait. The sophisticated metropolis boasts museums, winding streets and even a cable car. No wonder many travelers compare it to San Francisco.

Despite its steep hills, the city can be easily explored on foot. Kelburn Cable Car, stairways and footpaths climb the slopes from the city center.

Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
As your ship passes Harbour Heads, you are presented with the shimmering skyline of Sydney - hailed by many seafarers as "the most beautiful harbor in the world." Two prominent landmarks, Harbour Bridge and the sail-like curves of the Sydney Opera House, grace the backdrop of this picturesque harbor. There is a wealth of adventure waiting in Sydney - from its cosmopolitan city center to miles of beautiful beaches and the Blue Mountains.

Australia's oldest and largest city was born in 1788 with the arrival of the "First Fleet" transporting 760 British convicts. Today, Sydney is the largest port in the South Pacific and is often voted the most popular destination in the South Pacific.

Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
Once considered the "country cousin" among Australian cities, Brisbane is today the nation's third-largest metropolis - and one of the most desirable places to live in the country. Lying on the banks of the meandering Brisbane River, this cosmopolitan city boasts elegant 19th-century sandstone buildings, a lively cultural scene and superb parklands. Brisbane is also your gateway to uniquely Australian adventures, be it the theme parks of the Gold Coast or Queensland's dazzling beaches.

The beaches south of Brisbane form Queensland's Gold Coast. Travel tip: Brisbane is pronounced "Bris-bin."

Yorkeys Knob (Cairns), Queensland, Australia
The picturesque town of Yorkeys Knob, dominated by its dramatic headland, is your gateway to Cairns - one of Australia's hottest vacation destinations. Cairns boasts three of Australia's great natural wonders. Just offshore, immense bastions of living coral form the Great Barrier Reef. Sixteen miles of superb beaches stretch to the north of the city - the famed Marlin Coast. Inland lays the ancient rainforest of Daintree National Park.

Cairns' graceful, tree-lined esplanade was once the gateway to the gold fields of North Queensland. A travel tip - Cairns is pronounced "cans."

Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia
Closer to Indonesia than to any other Australian city, Darwin is the capital of the "Top End" - the remote, vast Northern Territory. Home to more than half of the territory's population, the city reflects the rugged endurance and individualism required to survive the Outback. Darwin also boasts a colorful history to add to that heritage. During World War II the Japanese bombed the city and threatened invasion. In 1974, Cyclone Tracy cut a destructive swath through the region. In addition, man-eating crocodiles, tropical monsoons, searing heat and bush fires that burn for weeks are all part of everyday life.

Locals in the Top End consume over 60 gallons of beer a year. All those empties don't go to waste: Each year Darwin residents compete in the Beer Can Regatta, a race with boats, rafts and other vessels manufactured out of beer cans.

Bali (Benoa), Indonesia
For over a century, Bali has fascinated the Western imagination. The island embodies the very essence of the exotic and mysterious East. Steep hillsides of tropical green reveal terraced rice paddies while plantations of coffee, banana, cacao and fragrant spices line the roads. Monkeys haunt the grounds of a sacred temple in a forest, while traditional villages produce intricately stylized batik, superb jewelry and beautiful paintings. And Balinese dance, with its angular movements and rhythms, remains somehow stirring and shocking. Bali may be accessible, but it remains forever exotic.

For all Bali's scenic beauty, the island has weathered great natural disasters, from the 1963 eruption of Mt. Agung to a massive earthquake in 1976. The island emerged relatively unscathed from the great tsunami of 2004.

Note: All motorcoaches are equipped with air-conditioning.

Singapore
Singapore - the very name summons visions of the mysterious East. The commercial center of Southeast Asia, this island city-state of five million people is a metropolis of modern high-rise buildings, Chinese shop-houses with red-tiled roofs, sturdy Victorian buildings, Buddhist temples and Arab bazaars. Founded in 1819 by Sir Stamford Raffles of the fabled East India Company, the city is a melting pot of people and cultures. Malay, Chinese, English and Tamil are official languages. Buddhism, Taoism, Islam, Hinduism and Christianity are the major faiths. Singapore is an ever-fascinating island boasting colorful traditions, luxurious hotels and some of the finest duty-free shopping in the world.

Lying just 85 miles north of the Equator at the tip of the Malay Peninsula, the island was a haven for Malay pirates and Chinese and Arab traders.

Langkawi, Malaysia
Langkawi comprises a group of 99 tropical islands lying off the northwestern coast of Peninsular Malaysia. The main island is known as Pulau Langkawi. The islands are shrouded with an intriguing heritage of myths and legends that feature ogres and gigantic birds, warriors and fairy princesses, battles and romance. Langkawi has been accorded the Geopark status by UNESCO, for its beautiful geological heritage of stunning landscapes, karsts, caves, sea-arches, stacks, glacial dropstones and fossils. With a geological history dating back 500 million years, the islands contain unique rock formations that stir the imagination and baffle the mind.

Phuket, Thailand
Hailed as the "Pearl of the Andaman Sea," this island off Thailand's long southern coast boasts a colorful history. A crossroads for trade, Phuket has been a melting pot of Thai, Malay, Chinese and Western influences. Its importance over the past 500 years stemmed from the island's natural resources, which include tin, hardwoods and rubber. In the past half-century, Phuket has enjoyed wide popularity as one of the premier travel destinations in Southeast Asia. Travelers are drawn to the island's beaches, crystalline waters, and dramatic, forested hills.

Colombo, Sri Lanka
Sri Lanka conjures up the exotic and the mysterious. Once known as Ceylon, the island boasts a fantastic landscape that ranges from primeval rain forest to the bustling modern streets of Colombo, the capital. A visitor to Sri Lanka has a wealth of options. Relax on some of the world's finest beaches. Explore the temples, halls and palaces of the last Sinhalese kingdom at Kandy. Or take a guided tour of an elephant orphanage. Colombo also offers an array of charms, from the Royal Botanic Gardens, once a royal pleasure garden, to the Pettah Bazaar, where vendors hawk everything under the sun.

Colombo and Sri Lanka were shaped by Hindu, Buddhist, Muslim and European influences. Colombo also serves as a gateway for Overland Adventures to India.

Dubai, United Arab Emirates
Dubai has always served as a bridge between East and West. In the past, Dubai's trade links stretched from Western Europe to Southeast Asia and China. The result was the creation of one of the most protean societies in the world. Nestled in the very heart of Islam, Dubai remains unique in its embrace of the West. Bedouin may still roam the desert, but Dubai also plays hosts to international tennis and golf tournaments. Tourists flock to its shores while the pace of development continues at a frenetic pace, from massive artificial islands to the astounding Burj Al Arab Hotel.

Dubai is actually two cities in one: the Khor Dubai, an inlet of the Persian Gulf, separates Deira, the old city, from Bur Dubai.

Pricing (per person)

  • All (7)
Quad Triple Twin Single

IA - Inside Cabin

AU$ 12,890 AU$ 13,829 AU$ 16,650 AU$ 32,389

OW - Obstructed Oceanview Cabin

AU$ 12,489 AU$ 13,923 AU$ 16,790 AU$ 32,669

OE - Oceanview Cabin

AU$ 13,035 AU$ 14,337 AU$ 16,940 AU$ 32,969

OC - Oceanview Stateroom

AU$ 12,889 AU$ 14,456 AU$ 17,590 AU$ 34,269

O6 - Outside

AU$ 13,680 AU$ 15,197 AU$ 18,230 AU$ 35,549

BY - Balcony Cabin (Obstructed View)

AU$ 15,850 AU$ 17,367 AU$ 20,400 AU$ 39,889

B2 - Premium Balcony Cabin

AU$ 17,459 AU$ 19,826 AU$ 24,560 AU$ 48,209

Please note, while prices and inclusions are accurate at time of loading they are subject to change due to changes in cruise line policies and pricing and due to currency fluctuations. Currency surcharges may apply. Please check details of price and inclusions at time of booking.

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World Wide Cruise Centre
World Wide Cruise Centre