Quest, Route Of The Vikings ex Southampton to Montreal

Atlantic Trans

Details

24 Night cruise sailing from Southampton to Montreal onboard Seabourn Quest.

24 Night cruise sailing from Southampton to Montreal onboard Seabourn Quest.

Seabourn Quest is the third iteration of the vessel design that has been called “a game-changer for the luxury segment.” True to her Seabourn bloodlines, wherever she sails around the world, Seabourn Quest carries with her a bevy of award-winning dining venues that are comparable to the finest restaurants to be found anywhere. Seabourn Quest offers a variety of dining options to suit every taste and every mood, with never an extra charge.

Highlights of this cruise:

Southampton (London), England
The south of England boasts a dramatic coastline which encloses some of the most beautiful countryside in Britain. The landscape of hills and heaths, downland and forests, valleys and dales, is without rival. Southampton, the United Kingdom's premier passenger ship port, and home for many years to the great transatlantic liners of yesteryear, has a rich and varied heritage. The remains of the medieval town walls are among the best preserved in the country and fascinating monuments can be found all around the city.

Falmouth, England, United Kingdom
Falmouth has a fine natural harbor, but has lost its earlier importance as a seaport and now caters mainly to yachts and boating for holidaymakers. Falmouth has the mildest winter climate in England.

Cobh (Cork), Ireland
Ireland’s second-largest city, Cork takes belligerent pride in its history of rebellion. It was founded in the 4th century by St. Finbarr, for whom its first cathedral is named. Hardly less sacred to its citizens is the Cork City Gaol, where its rebel heroes often resided. Visit the Crawford Art Gallery for its collection of native Irish painters, and Blarney Castle for a look at feudal history. Further afield, nearby Cobh, formerly known as Queenstown, has an Emigration Centre tracing the history of the great Irish diaspora.

Dublin, Ireland
Historic Dublin, the capital of Ireland, is rich in tradition and heritage. Founded in 841 as a Viking settlement, Dublin remained under Viking rule until the Norman invasion of Ireland in the 12th century. Divided by the Liffey and Tolka rivers, Dublin is a truly quaint and picturesque city. Bridges, waterways, narrow alleyways, and beautiful Georgian architecture await discovery. Dublin’s 751 pubs support a traditional folk music scene second to none. Wandering along its streets, you cannot avoid noticing the city’s different faces -- its cobblestone streets next to modern and mid-century buildings, massive stone churches heavy with the weight of ages, and colorful storefronts with ornate woodcarvings.

Stornoway, Isle Of Lewis, Scotland, United Kingdom
Stornoway, on the Isle of Lewis in the Outer Hebrides, was founded by Vikings in the 9th century. But the Hebridean culture goes back much further, as testified by the circles of standing stones that are found on the island, and shards of pottery dated from at least 5,000 years in the past. There are remnants of various historic periods to be seen here, including traditional blackhouses, an ancient design, some of which were incredibly still in use into the 1970s. Lews Castle, which overlooks the town, is a more modern copy of a Tudor manse, which was built by a former owner of the island. Latta’s Mill, a 19th century overshot water mill, has been reconstructed and operates as an attraction. The main occupations on Lewis are fishing, farming, and production of Harris Tweed, a traditional cloth named for another nearby Hebrides isle.

Heimaey, Westman Islands, Iceland
Heimaey Island is the largest in the Westman Islands located four miles off the south-west coast of Iceland. One of the most visually impressive islands in Iceland, it is ringed by tall, vertical sea cliffs many hundreds of feet high. Heimaey is also the home to over eight million Atlantic puffins, more nesting puffins than anywhere else on earth. A local story tells that puffin chicks, taking their first flights at night, often become stranded in the village streets, where the local children rescue them and set them free the next day.

Reykjavik, Iceland
Reykjavik, Iceland’s capital, is the northern-most national capital in the world. Its name translates as ‘smoky bay’, referencing the geothermal nature of the surrounding area. The city benefits from astonishing landscapes shaped by glaciers, earthquakes, and volcanic activity throughout the centuries. An amphitheater of mountains encircles the greater Reykjavik area, a coastline indented with coves, peninsulas and islands. Most of city’s growth came during the early 20th century, and the majority of its architecture is typical of that era. Colorful rooftops and the elegant spire of Hallgrímskirkja Church dominate Reykjaviks’s skyline. Known for its arts, Reykjavik hosts a number of internationally recognized festivals, most notably the Iceland Air music festival, Reykjavik Arts Festival and the Reykjavik International Film Festival.

Vigur, Iceland
The Westfjords in northwest Iceland is a remote and sparsely populated peninsula of steep, tall mountains cut by dozens of fjords. The lack of flat lowlands suitable for farming played a key role in keeping this region wild and sparsely populated. The raw and untamed natural landscape around Ísafjörður is characterized by a subarctic environment. A colorful show of blooming tundra wildflowers carpets the mountain slopes and valleys during the short, cool summer.

Cruising Prince Christian Sund
The transit of the Prince Christian Sound is one of the highlights of cruising in Greenland. The approximately 60-mile sound cuts between the mainland and an archipelago of islands from east to west, under the southern edge of the massive Greenland Ice Sheet, which covers 80 percent of the island. The sound is narrow, sometimes as little as 1500 feet across, and numerous glaciers reach the sea on its shores, calving icebergs into the sound. High, barren and sharply defined peaks tower on both sides. The only indications of humanity to be seen are the Ikerassasuaq weather station (using the Greenlandic name for the sound) where the ship enters, and the small village of Appilattoq, housing approximately 100 people. Animal life is more abundant, with minke, fin and blue whales seen frequently, as well as ringed and bearded seals that haul out on the floating ice. It is a breathtaking display of natural splendor in the severe, rugged vernacular of rock, ice and sea that is unique to the arctic realm.

Qaqortoq, Greenland
Qaqortoq is the largest city in Southern Greenland with 3,300 inhabitants. The town occupies steep rises above the natural small-boat harbor bounded by fish, shrimp and fur processing plants. It was founded in 1775 by the Dano-Norwegian trader Anders Olsen, working on behalf of the General Trading Company.

St Johns, Newfoundland, Canada
Saint John's is the most easterly point in North America and closest point of land to Europe. Due to it strategic location, Saint John's has been vitally important for centuries to explorers, adventurers, merchants, soldiers, pirates, and all manner of seafarers, who provided the foundation for this thriving modern day city. Explore this, one of the oldest cities in North America, and a city unlike any other. This "City of Legends" is cradled in a harbor carved from granite, and surrounded by hills running down to the ocean. Quaint side streets of a thousand colors are home to friendly faces that wait to greet you.

Quebec City, Quebec, Canada
Founded in 1608, Quebec City is the capital of the Canadian province of Quebec and the cradle of French Canadian civilization. With its historic ramparts, churches and Old Town, it is considered one of the most beautiful cities in North America. Originally inhabited by First Nations peoples and known as Stadacona, the city is a magnificent living-history lesson with a remarkable mix of 17th century architecture, heritage, art, and culture, Quebec means ‘narrow passage’ in Algonquin, and it is here that the St. Lawrence narrows and is dominated by the steep cliffs of Cape Diamond, 333’ (102 m) above. Crowned by The Citadel, an imposing bastioned fortress, the heights of Quebec have defined the city since its founding. Elegant Château Frontenac towers above The Lower Town, a UNESCO World Heritage treasure.

Montreal, Quebec, Canada
The City of Montreal is a striking union of old-world charm and new-world attitude. Its name refers to the triple-peaked hill in the heart of the city, Mount Royal. The site has been occupied for 4,000 years and was originally home to First Nations people and known as Hochelaga. It began its current life in 1611 as a fur trading post established by the ‘Father of New France’, Samuel de Champlain. With over 4,000,000 inhabitants, today it is the world’s second largest French-speaking city, after Paris.

Pricing (per person)

  • All (13)
Quad Triple Twin Single

A - Oceanview Suite

Request Request AU$ 18,998 Request

A1 - Oceanview Suite

Request Request AU$ 19,398 Request

OB - Suite

Request Request AU$ 21,998 Request

V1 - Veranda Suite

Request Request AU$ 21,998 Request

V4 - Veranda Suite

Request Request AU$ 21,998 Request

V2 - Veranda Suite

Request Request AU$ 23,498 Request

V5 - Veranda Suite

Request Request AU$ 23,498 Request

V3 - Veranda Suite

Request Request AU$ 24,998 Request

V6 - Veranda Suite

Request Request AU$ 24,998 Request

SA - Suite

Request Request AU$ 27,774 Request

SV - Suite

Request Request AU$ 32,274 Request

PH - Penthouse Suite

Request Request AU$ 33,998 Request

OW - Owners Suite

Request Request AU$ 44,998 Request

Please note, while prices and inclusions are accurate at time of loading they are subject to change due to changes in cruise line policies and pricing and due to currency fluctuations. Currency surcharges may apply. Please check details of price and inclusions at time of booking.

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World Wide Cruise Centre
World Wide Cruise Centre