Royal Clipper, Panama to Antigua ex Balboa to St John's

Panama & Central America

Details

14 Night Cruise sailing from Balboa to St John's aboard Royal Clipper.

14 Night Cruise sailing from Balboa to St John's aboard Royal Clipper.

Inspired by the tall ship Preussen, the Royal Clipper has the proud distinction of being the largest and only five-masted full-rigged sailing ship built since her predecessor was launched at the beginning of the last century. With her complement of 42 sails, Royal Clipper is a splendid sight to behold.

You might think she was an apparition from the grand age of sail, but Royal Clipper is as new as tomorrow, boasting state-of-the-art navigation systems and every comfort and luxury one could wish for. For connoisseurs of sail cruising, the 439 foot Royal Clipper offers the ultimate sea-going experience, balancing the grandeur, adventure and tradition of sailing with the superb service, amenities and accommodations of the finest modern yacht. Royal Clipper carries just 227 guests in luxurious style. A full 19,000 square feet of open deck and three swimming pools create a wonderfully spacious and expansive outdoor environment.

Find your secret hideaway on one of the hidden balconies on either side of the bow. Or climb the mast (with safety harness provided) to one of the passenger lookout crows-nests, thoughtfully furnished with a comfortable settee, where you’ll have the grandest view of all!

Royal Clipper’s interior spaces are just as dazzling. They include a three-deck atrium that funnels sunlight into the elegantly appointed, three-level dining room featuring open-seating dining, deliciously prepared cuisine and a no-tie dress code.

A convenient marina platform lowers from the stern for watersports. And the ultimate unique Royal Clipper experience, the one-of-a-kind Captain Nemo Lounge, is the site of our spa and health club with underwater glass portholes!

Highlights of this cruise:

Balboa (Isla Flamenco, Panama)
Along the piers of Balboa, the port marking the Pacific terminus of the Panama Canal, you'll see yachts from all over the world. Balboa was built to house American administrative headquarters for the Canal and many of the buildings are handsome examples of the American colonial style of the early 1900's.

San Blas Islands, Panama
The vivid colors of the San Blas Islands are undoubtedly the inspiration for the fanciful birds, fish and animals in brilliant reds, oranges, blues and greens that decorate the intricately appliquéd molas created by the indigenous Kuna women. Strung along the throat of Panama's dramatically beautiful Kuna Yala coast, the remoteness of these coral atolls protects an independent people who prize their communal culture with its rich oral history and artistic heritage.

Cartagena de Indias, Colombia
Cartagena is a UNESCO World Heritage site. Located on the north coast of Colombia, Cartagena host a spectacular collection of buildings and massive fortifications dating from the early 1600's. The Fortresses were built to protect Cartagena from pirates. City highlights include Saint Philip of Barajas Fortresses and the Fort Ferdinand Fort.

Oranjestad, Aruba
Bon boni means welcome in the local dialect, Papiamento, and it's universally understood by all who visit little Aruba. Just 15 miles from Venezuela, this almost independent nation still has a ceremonial Dutch Governor General. Once it depended on oil for income, but tourism is the new king. No wonder Aruba's endless beaches and spectacular diving are too tempting to pass up.

Willemstad, Curacao
The gabled houses and warehouses of Dutch colonial Willemstad march in tight formation along the entrance to St. Anna Bay, an incongruous vision of a tropical Amsterdam where the floating market sells mangos and papayas instead of tulips. In Curacao's interior cunucu, a few Dutch landhuis or farm owners still wrest a living by ranching on the near-desert soil.

Kralendijk, Bonaire
Pink flamingoes, divi-divi trees, Papiamento and the best diving in the Caribbean - You can only be in Bonaire. The blinding white salt flats of Bonaire were once marked by tall obelisks of red, white, blue and orange (the colours of the old Dutch flag) to guide mariners. Today they are marked by clouds of pink - enormous flocks (500 or more!) of fluttering flamingoes feasting on the orange brine shrimp that gives the flamingoes their unmistakable colour.

St Georges, Grenada
The aromas of nutmeg, cinnamon and vanilla baking in the sun - these are the tropical flavours of Grenada. From the horseshoe shaped Carenage at St. George's, follow the Sendall Tunnel (hand-built in 1895) to the Esplanade and old Ft. George for a spectacular view of Grenada.

Soufriere Bay, St Lucia
Marigot Bay, one of the prettiest anchorages in the Caribbean, is surrounded by lush hills and ringed by drooping coconut palms. Our alternate stop, the little Port Town of Soufrière was named after a nearby volcano. Prettier sights are to be seen at Diamond Falls and Mineral Baths where you can walk through the gardens and take a dip in the pool under the waterfalls.

Deshaies, Guadeloupe
Guadeloupe looks like a butterfly from the air. Its giant wings are actually two islands, separated by the Rivière Salée, a natural salt water channel. Basse Terre, the southern or leeward part of Guadeloupe, is lush and rugged, dominated by La Soufrière.

St John's, Antigua
The dockyards, marinas, old inns, venerable pubs and convivial crowds of sun-tanned yacht crews; this is the epicentre of the Caribbean yachting world.

Pricing (per person)

  • All (1)
Quad Triple Twin Single

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Please note, while prices and inclusions are accurate at time of loading they are subject to change due to changes in cruise line policies and pricing and due to currency fluctuations. Currency surcharges may apply. Please check details of price and inclusions at time of booking.

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World Wide Cruise Centre
World Wide Cruise Centre