Crown, My Caribbean Explorer ex Ft Lauderdale Return

Caribbean

Details

20 Night Cruise sailing from Ft Lauderdale roundtrip aboard Crown Princess.

20 Night Cruise sailing from Ft Lauderdale roundtrip aboard Crown Princess.

Enjoy sweeping views of the world while sailing on Crown Princess. From her nearly 900 balconies to the breathtaking three-story Atrium, you'll discover a relaxing atmosphere filled with an array of world class entertainment and dining options that will greet you each day when you return from making fascinating discoveries ashore.

Highlights of this cruise:

Ft Lauderdale
According to the popular 1960 beach movie, Fort Lauderdale is "where the boys are." The city's reputation as America's Spring Break capital, however, has been replaced with the more favorable image of a prime family tourist destination, attracting more than 10 million visitors annually. The most popular beach resort in Florida is even more rightly famed as the "Yachting Capital of the World," with more than 40,000 registered crafts calling its waters home. The city also prides itself on being the "Venice of America" with more than 300 miles of navigable waterways. Fort Lauderdale boasts world-class theaters, museums, sightseeing, and shopping.

The city sits 24 miles north of Miami and is named after a series of forts built by the United States during the second Seminole War. The forts took their name from Major William Lauderdale, who was the commander of the detachment of soldiers who built the first fort. Look hard and you might find remnants of three of them today. More people seem to be interested in taking a water tour aboard the "Carrie B."

Bonaire
Bonaire is without a doubt a "diver's paradise." Its license plates even state the same. But there is much more to this small Dutch country of 17,500 residents. "Bon Bini," as you will hear the friendly locals say, means "welcome to the island of Bonaire." Bonaire is located off the coast of Venezuela and has for years been known as a world-class diving and snorkeling destination. Diving and snorkeling are still the predominant activities, but today there is also a variety of other activities to enjoy such as kayaking, bird watching, and other eco-tours. Because of the hot and arid weather, Bonaire has been a major producer of sea salt. Do not miss the "white mountains" waiting to be shipped out and the salt flats where the salt is evaporated from the Caribbean Sea, which also happens to be home to another icon of Bonaire-the pink flamingo. Explore the Dutch architecture of the capital Kralendijk, enjoy the pristine coral reefs, or tour the scenic countryside. Whatever you decide to do in Bonaire, you are sure to have a fantastic time.

Curacao
Historians still contend over which European adventurer first spied the largest island in the former Netherlands Antilles. Some historians claim the honor for Alonzo de Ojeda; other historians champion Amerigo Vespucci. Little does it matter; today's travelers are content to bask beneath sunny skies cooled by the trade winds. Lying some 40 miles off Venezuela, Curaçao boasts a landscape that is dramatic, stark, and volcanic. In contrast, Willemstad, the capital, seems a cozy Dutch haven with its neat row houses. And while those gabled and tiled roofs illustrate the island's heritage, the bright, pastel houses speak pure Caribbean. Islanders themselves reflect this same colorful contrast: over 50 different nationalities have come to call Curaçao their home.

Grenada
Grenada is the Caribbean's "Isle of Spice" -- one of the world's major producers of nutmeg, mace, clove, cinnamon, and cocoa. Indeed, the fragrant aroma of spice seems to envelop the island's emerald hillsides, tropical forests, and sun-drenched beaches. Grenada is truly a feast for the senses. Americans, of course, may remember the island from the 1983 U.S. military intervention. Over two decades later, Grenada is again an ideal vacation spot. No building here may be built higher than a coconut palm. The majority of hotels are small and family owned. St. George's Harbor is a picture-perfect postcard of an idyllic Caribbean anchorage.

Dominica
Lying between Guadeloupe and Martinique is the island of Dominica--an unspoiled Caribbean paradise. The vibrant, rich rainforest is home to rare birds, including Sisserou and Jacquot parrots. Streams tumble down mountain slopes and thread fertile valleys on their short route to the sea. Dominica is also home to the last Carib Indians. When Columbus made landfall on his second voyage of discovery, this fierce tribe managed to keep the explorer at bay. And while the island proved a lure for both British and French planters, Dominica somehow managed to escape the trammels of civilization. This former British possession, independent since 1978, today lures visitors from around the world with its unspoiled beauty. As the islanders fondly say, "Apres Bondi, c'est la terre" (After God, it is the land). Tours may travel narrow, winding roads.

St Thomas
The US Virgin Islands are America's paradise, offering an easygoing blend of island ways and American practicality. St. Thomas, capital of the island group, offers every imaginable sport: snorkeling, golfing, hiking, and sailing. Just a few miles away lay St. John and Virgin Islands National Park. Stunning mountain scenery, crystalline waters, and white-sand beaches with palms swaying in the breeze - the US Virgin Islands are truly a slice of paradise. The harbor is easily one of the Caribbean's most scenic. The United States purchased the Virgin Islands from Denmark for $25 million in gold. St. Thomas has a reputation as a duty free-mecca for shopping.

Grand Turk
Grand Turk, the capital of the Turks and Caicos Islands, is a small island bursting with turn-of-the-century Caribbean charm, retaining the look and feel of the Caribbean 40 years ago. Grand Turk was founded by Bermudan salt rakers some three centuries ago and its Bermudan-British-colonial architecture surrounded by colorful local dwellings make the island a treasure to visit. It is recognized as being one of the first places in the New World where Christopher Columbus landed and also gained worldwide attention when John Glenn splashed down near Grand Turk on his historic first mission to space. Grand Turk is six miles long and just over a mile wide with a population of only 6,000. It is blessed with miles of uncrowded, beautiful beaches and is close to several uninhabited cays such as Gibb's Cay, home of the stingray encounter. While there are many landside attractions to explore such as the Old Prison, Lighthouse Park, and the re-created salt salina, the real beauty of the island lies underwater. Grand Turk is world-famous for its healthy and beautiful coral reefs that surround the island, stretching almost from the coastline to the 7,000-foot vertical wall just offshore.

Princess Cays
Join us at our exclusive port of call, Princess Cays, where you'll enjoy a private beach party on the island of Eleuthera in the Bahamas. One hundred miles long and only two miles wide, Eleuthera offers unspoiled beaches. Our private resort at Princess Cays is situated on more than 40 acres and features over a half-mile of white-sand shoreline, all at the southern tip of the island. The resort boasts outstanding amenities while carefully preserving this natural paradise. Take in the views from the observation tower. Enjoy a complimentary beach barbecue. Sip a cool drink or browse the shops and the local craft market. All of Princess Cays' facilities are linked by walkways. Recreational activities abound. Enjoy volleyball and a full range of water sports, or simply relax on the beach.

St Kitts
Jagged volcanoes soaring above azure and turquoise seas, dense rainforests in myriad shades of green, rolling fields of sugarcane--welcome to St. Kitts. Along with its neighbor, Nevis, St. Kitts presents an exotic landscape more common to Polynesia than the Caribbean. The islands' terrain, rich soil, and climate made them ideal locations for raising sugarcane. In fact, St. Kitts and Nevis were once the crown jewels of the Caribbean. During the 17th and 18th centuries, Spain, France and England vied for control of the islands, with the English finally winning out in 1787. Today, British and French heritage is evident on both islands. Basseterre, the capital of St. Kitts, boasts fine, restored colonial buildings. Impressive Brimstone Hill Fortress, called the "Gibraltar of the West Indies," is one of the most impressive fortresses in the Caribbean.

St Lucia
Nestled below the Pitons, twin peaks rising over 2,600 feet above the azure waters of the Caribbean, St. Lucia is an oasis of tropical calm. The island's capital, Castries, is a town of charming, pastel-colored colonial buildings, home to some 60,000. Yet despite its peaceful setting, St. Lucia has a turbulent and colorful history. Fierce Carib warriors overran the peaceful Arawaks in the 9th century. The first European settler, Francois Le Clerc, was a French buccaneer. Le Clerc's countrymen followed in his wake, establishing the town of Soufriere in 1746. Sugar was the lure, sugar was king. Within four decades some 50 plantations flourished on the island. Thus St. Lucia became part of the Caribbean's 18th-century trade triangle of sugar, slavery, and rum. Today this beautiful island welcomes visitors drawn to its exotic tropical landscape, superb beaches, crystalline waters, and colorful marine life.

Barbados
Barbados is one of the few Caribbean islands solely colonized by one nation. It's no wonder Bajans describe their country as being "more English than England sheself," surnames like Worthing and Hastings abound. But look around and you know you're not in England: rich and fertile tropical fields meet a glistening, azure sea. The soft pastels of old chattel houses blend with the vibrant reds, oranges, and greens of roadside fruit stands. In short, Barbados exudes a charm all its own. Perhaps it is due to Bajan culture, that celebrated blend of English tradition and the African heritage brought to the island by slaves imported to work the sugar plantations. The potent brew which results flavors every aspect of island life, from music, dance and art, to religion, language and food.

Antigua
The largest of the British Leeward Islands, Antigua (pronounced an-tee-ga) boasts one of the Caribbean's most spectacular coastlines with secluded coves and sun-drenched beaches. The island's rolling hills are dotted with stone sugar mills, relics from the bygone era when sugar was king. Historic Nelson's Dockyard, where Admiral Horatio Nelson quartered his fleet in 1784, attests to Antigua's long and colorful nautical history during colonial times. And St. John's, the island's bustling capital, offers visitors a wealth of boutiques, restaurants and pubs.

Pricing (per person)

  • All (8)
Quad Triple Twin Single

IF - Inside Stateroom

Request Request AU$ 2,765 AU$ 5,530

IE - Inside Stateroom

Request Request AU$ 2,815 AU$ 5,630

IC - Inside Stateroom

Request Request AU$ 2,915 AU$ 5,830

IA - Inside Stateroom

Request Request AU$ 3,015 AU$ 6,030

OY - Oceanview (Obstructed View)

Request Request AU$ 3,055 AU$ 6,110

OV - Oceanview (Obstructed View)

Request Request AU$ 3,115 AU$ 6,230

OF - Oceanview Stateroom

Request Request AU$ 3,395 AU$ 6,790

BB - Balcony Stateroom

Request Request AU$ 4,554 AU$ 9,108

Please note, while prices and inclusions are accurate at time of loading they are subject to change due to changes in cruise line policies and pricing and due to currency fluctuations. Currency surcharges may apply. Please check details of price and inclusions at time of booking.

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World Wide Cruise Centre
World Wide Cruise Centre