Shadow, Voyage 3919 ex Rome to Barcelona


  • Last Minute Savings - Book Before 30 April 2019
    Receive One Category Suite Upgrade PLUS $1000 per Suite Onboard Credit. (*See T&C's Below).
EU Mediterranean

Details

10 Night Cruise sailing from Rome to Barcelona aboard Silver Shadow.

10 Night Cruise sailing from Rome to Barcelona aboard Silver Shadow.

Oceanside villages, treasures of Antiquity, authentic cuisine... Visit the Mediterranean once and you'll be hooked for life. Enjoy a glass of Corsican wine in one of the Porto-Vecchio piazzas, walk through the old town and smell the colourful heaps of spices in the Provencal market in Antibes and climb the tiers of marble seats of the Museo del Teatro Romano in Cartagena.

Highlights of this cruise:

Rome (Civitavecchia)
Italy's vibrant capital lives in the present, but no other city on earth evokes its past so powerfully. For over 2,500 years, emperors, popes, artists, and common citizens have left their mark here. Archaeological remains from ancient Rome, art-stuffed churches, and the treasures of Vatican City vie for your attention, but Rome is also a wonderful place to practice the Italian-perfected il dolce far niente, the sweet art of idleness. Your most memorable experiences may include sitting at a caffè in the Campo de' Fiori or strolling in a beguiling piazza.

Olbia
Amid the resorts of Sardinia's northeastern coast, Olbia, a town of about 60,000, is a lively little seaport and port of call for mainland ferries at the head of a long, wide bay.San SimplicioOlbia's little Catholic basilica, a short walk behind the main Corso Umberto and past the train station, is worth searching out if you have any spare time in Olbia. The simple granite structure dates from the 11th century, part of the great Pisan church-building program, using pillars and columns recycled from Roman buildings.

Porto-Vecchio, Corsica
Set on a hillock overlooking a beautiful deep blue bay, Porto Vecchio, 15 miles (25km) north of Bonifacio, was rated by Scottish author James Boswell as one of "the most distinguished harbours in Europe". It was founded in 1539 as a second Genoese stronghold on the east coast, Bastia being well established in the north. The site was perfect; close to the unexploited and fertile plain, it benefited from secure high land and a sheltered harbour, although the mosquito population spread malaria and wiped out the first Ligurian settlers within months.

Livorno
Livorno is a gritty city with a long and interesting history. In the early Middle Ages it alternately belonged to Pisa and Genoa. In 1421 Florence, seeking access to the sea, bought it. Cosimo I (1519–74) started construction of the harbor in 1571, putting Livorno on the map. After Ferdinando I de' Medici (1549–1609) proclaimed Livorno a free city, it became a haven for people suffering from religious persecution; Roman Catholics from England and Jews and Moors from Spain and Portugal, among others, settled here.

Ile Rousse, Corsica
“Where the mountains meet the sea,” the beautiful island of Corsica, set in the blue waters of the Mediterranean between Italy and France, is steeped in history. Ile Rousse is built on the site of an old roman settlement. She rivals Calvi as a seaside resort, with nice sandy beaches and good accommodation facilities. The port of Ile Rousse was built by Pasquale Paoli –most famous Corsican Patriot-in 1758 to replace Calvi, still in Genoese hands, has taken the place of first port in this region for exporting fresh fruit and olive oil.

Antibes
Located in the southeast of the French Provence region, Antibes ranks among France’s oldest cities. Originally named ‘Antipolis’, Antibes was founded by Greek merchants in the 5th century. The Old City is a maze of small, flower-bedecked streets with Roman and Medieval sections. A portion of the impressive 16th-century ramparts overlooking the Mediterranean Sea still protect the heart of the Old City. Antibes is comprised of three distinct sections. The first is Antibes, which includes the Old City and ramparts.

Palma de Mallorca
If you look north of the cathedral (La Seu, or the seat of the bishopric, to Mallorcans) on a map of the city of Palma, you can see around the Plaça Santa Eulàlia a jumble of tiny streets that made up the earliest settlement. Farther out, a ring of wide boulevards traces the fortifications built by the Moors to defend the larger city that emerged by the 12th century. The zigzags mark the bastions that jutted out at regular intervals. By the end of the 19th century, most of the walls had been demolished.

Cartagena
Don’t be put off by Cartagena’s outskirts, which house chemical plants and mining machinery; plunge straight into the Old Town near the port instead. Old Town is steeped in history and bustling with life. The Roman ruins here are among some of the best in the country and Cartagena’s tapas are justly famed. Holy Week processions are as moving as those in Seville and Málaga, and music fans will enjoy the Mar de Músicas international music festival in July and the Jazz Festival in November.

Valencia
Valencia is a proud city. During the Civil War, it was the last seat of the Republican Loyalist government (1935–36), holding out against Franco’s National forces until the country fell to 40 years of dictatorship. Today it represents the essence of contemporary Spain—daring design and architecture along with experimental cuisine—but remains deeply conservative and proud of its traditions. Though it faces the Mediterranean, Valencia's history and geography have been defined most significantly by the River Turia and the fertile floodplain (huerta) that surrounds it.

Barcelona
The infinite variety of street life, the nooks and crannies of the medieval Barri Gòtic, the ceramic tile and stained glass of Art Nouveau facades, the art and music, the throb of street life, the food (ah, the food!)—one way or another, Barcelona will find a way to get your full attention. The capital of Catalonia is a banquet for the senses, with its beguiling mix of ancient and modern architecture, tempting cafés and markets, and sun-drenched Mediterranean beaches.

Pricing (per person)

  • All (4)
Quad Triple Twin Single

VI - Vista Suite

Request Request AU$ 8,900 Request

B1 - Veranda 1 Suite

Request Request AU$ 11,500 Request

B2 - Veranda 2 Suite

Request Request AU$ 11,600 Request

B3 - Veranda 3 Suite

Request Request AU$ 11,800 Request

Please note, while prices and inclusions are accurate at time of loading they are subject to change due to changes in cruise line policies and pricing and due to currency fluctuations. Currency surcharges may apply. Please check details of price and inclusions at time of booking.

Terms & Conditions

*All fares shown are cruise-only, available in AUD / USD, per guest, based on double-occupancy. Fares are capacity controlled and subject to change at any time without notice. Last Minute Savings offer valid on new, individual bookings made between 1 March, 2019 and 30 April, 2019. Offer is not applicable to group bookings. Single supplements will apply and vary by voyage. Guests benefit from a one-category suite upgrade (up to Deluxe Veranda on Silver Cloud, Silver Spirit and Silver Muse; up to Terrace on Silver Galapagos; up to Veranda 4 on Silver Shadow and Silver Whisper; up to Mid Veranda on Silver Wind, and up to Vista on Silver Explorer and Silver Discoverer) and a US$1,000 onboard credit per suite. If the one-category upgrade is not available guests will instead receive a US$500 onboard credit per suite. Guests travelling on combination voyages will be eligible for the upgrade and onboard credit on the qualifying segment, but not on those segments that are not part of the Last Minute Savings promotion. To reserve a Silversea cruise under the Last Minute Savings promotion, a 50% deposit of the total booking cost is required within two (2) days of booking. Full payment is due no later than 120 days prior to departure. Cancel and re-books do not qualify. Other restrictions may apply.

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World Wide Cruise Centre
World Wide Cruise Centre